Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Africa: Africa

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A New Extreme Event Analysis Tool in Support of the UN Paris Agreement



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Predicting Dengue Transmission in a Changing Climate to Improve Mosquito Control



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Using Large Marine Protected Areas to Recover Highly Productive Marine Ecosystems and the Services They Provide: the Case of the Adriatic Sea

Fishing practices that use gear that is dragged on the seafloor, such as bottom trawling, destroy and degrade marine habitats on continental shelves, the most productive areas of the global ocean. However, there has been little assessment of the outcomes of trawling restrictions, impeding progress towards solutions. This project will use ecological and economic models to examine the potential outcomes of a large-scale trawling ban in the Mediterranean Sea and will assess any implications for marine ecosystem function and services. This project provides a unique opportunity to contribute new knowledge and guidance in addressing issues related to bottom trawling, and holds promise to inform solutions in regions around the globe.



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New Solutions for Global Control of Parasitic Infections: The Case of Schistosomiasis



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Mineral dust components in aerosols and their effect on ocean productivity

Researchers are determining the impact that aerosol dust particles have on marine productivity and ecosystem structure and are using the Gulf of Aqaba as a representative study area. The Sahara and adjacent deserts are a major source of aerosols and mineral dust to the atmosphere and contribute to the aerosol load in the vicinity of the Gulf of Aqaba. Since dust emission has increased due to desertification at the borders of the Sahara, emission rates and the resulting effects on climate are now being impacted (potentially severely) by anthropogenic activities. The objective of our work is to elucidate the coupling among aerosol mineralogy, dust sources, deposition rates, and ecosystem responses. Our findings will play a critical role in determining anthropogenic impacts on ocean productivity and resulting climatic impacts, helping to develop the science to predict and policies to mitigate environmental and ecological impacts to our oceans.



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The Effects of Wildlife Loss and Land Use Change on Rodent-Borne Disease Risk in East Africa

This project explores whether the loss of large wildlife and changes in land use increase the risk of infectious disease in developing tropical countries.



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