Skip to content Skip to navigation

All News: Noah Diffenbaugh

March 19, 2021 | Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
As the U.S. Congress moves to prioritize climate change-related issues, unbiased scientific insight is in high demand. The U.S. House of... Read More
January 11, 2021 | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences
Researchers found that 36 percent of the costs of flooding in the U.S. from 1988 to 2017 were a result of intensifying precipitation, consistent with... Read More
September 24, 2020 | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences
Researchers have identified a new type of “landfalling drought” that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger... Read More
August 27, 2020 | Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
Unusual lightning strikes sparked the massive wildfires burning across California. Stanford climate and wildfire experts discuss extreme weather’s... Read More
a man in a mask standing in a field with tall plants
July 29, 2020 | Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
The researchers hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic’s unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our... Read More
sleeping firefighters
April 2, 2020
Study finds that autumn days with extreme fire weather have more than doubled in California since the early 1980s due to climate change. The results... Read More
March 18, 2020
A new Stanford study reveals that a common scientific approach of predicting the likelihood of future extreme weather events by analyzing how... Read More
January 27, 2020 | Stanford Earth
By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western U.S., scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of... Read More
Big Sur coastline
June 24, 2019 | Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences
New research shows that atmospheric rivers – plumes of moisture that deliver much of the west’s precipitation – have gotten warmer over the past 36... Read More

Pages