Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

NEWS & PRESS RELEASES: Noah Diffenbaugh

Noah Diffenbaugh, professor of Earth system science

What Happens if We Don't Meet Paris Agreement Goals? »

February 14, 2018

The Paris Agreement has aspirational goals of limiting temperature rise that won’t be met by current commitments. That difference could make the world another degree warmer and considerably more prone to extreme...

By Taylor Kubota, Stanford News Service

Best Case Scenario for International Climate Talks »

November 7, 2017

Experts from around the world are gathering in Bonn, Germany for the 23rd annual United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 23) to discuss a path to implementation of the historic Paris Climate Change Agreement.

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

rescuer in boat in Houston flooding

Stanford Experts on Hurricane Harvey Impacts »

September 1, 2017

Stanford experts comment on how climate change and infrastructure planning contribute to the severity of impacts from extreme weather events like Hurricane Harvey.

By Devon Ryan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

washed out road

Designing Infrastructure for a Changing Climate »

August 1, 2017

Stanford climate scientist Noah Diffenbaugh joins a team of scientists and engineers who will study the future of infrastructure design in California under worsening climate change impacts.

By Joanna Nurmis, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Q&A with Stanford experts on the president’s Paris agreement decision »

June 1, 2017

The president announced that the United States will withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. Four Stanford scholars discuss the implications of this decision.

By Devon Ryan, The Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Old Route 49 bridge crossing over the South Yuba River in Nevada City, Calif. in January 2017.

When Bridges Collapse »

April 28, 2017

Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

ocean waves

Testing Links Between Extreme Weather and Climate Change »

April 24, 2017

A new four-step “framework” aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.

By Ker Than, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

flooding

Heavy California Rains Par for the Course for Climate Change »

March 21, 2017

Stanford climatologist Noah Diffenbaugh explains why heavy rains during a drought are to be expected for a state in the throes of climate change.

By Ker Than, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Water over damage at Oroville Dam

Q&A With Stanford Experts Puts Oroville Dam Breach in Context »

February 15, 2017

As workers rush to repair the spillway at California’s Oroville Dam, Stanford researchers comment on how challenges like climate change and aging infrastructure heighten risks for California.

By Devon Ryan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Damage caused by Hurricane Sandy to the New Jersey coast.

How to Adapt to a Changing Climate »

January 31, 2017

Expert panel examines strategies and tools for adapting to current and future climate change-driven challenges.

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

mealworms

Revealing New Discoveries »

December 8, 2016

Stanford researchers will join colleagues from around the U.S. at the largest Earth and space science meeting in the world.

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

trees

How Will the Election Affect Environmental Policy? »

November 11, 2016

Stanford energy and environmental policy scholars suggest what a Donald Trump presidency could mean for such issues as U.S. participation in international agreements, environmental regulation and the Keystone Pipeline. ...

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

nearly snowless Tioga Pass and last winter’s blizzard in Washington, D.C.

Extreme-Weather Winters Becoming More Common »

September 1, 2016

The simultaneous occurrence of warm winters in the West and cold winters in the East has significantly increased in recent decades. The damaging and costly phenomenon is very likely attributable to human-caused climate...

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

muskrat

New Ideas for a Changing Environment »

July 12, 2016

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Announces 2016 Environmental Venture Projects and Realizing Environmental Innovation Program Grants

By Devon Ryan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Study: Amazon rain forest responds quickly to extreme climate events »

April 28, 2016

A new study examining carbon exchange in the Amazon rain forest following extremely hot and dry spells reveals tropical ecosystems might be more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.
The findings,...

By Ker Than, Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

nearly snowless Tioga Pass

Rise of the 'Ridiculously Resilient Ridge' »

April 1, 2016

Atmospheric patterns resembling those that appeared during the latter half of California's ongoing multi-year drought are becoming more common, according to Stanford scientists.

By Ker Than, Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

California state capitol in Sacramento

Woods Researchers on Water Future »

January 22, 2016

Woods researchers testify on water reuse, climate change effects and water innovation at hearings of California’s Select Committee on Water Consumption and Alternative Sources.

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

COP21: Informing Climate Agreement »

November 23, 2015

Decades of Stanford Research Underpin Global Climate Talks in Paris

By Leslie Willoughby, Stanford Woods Institute

Global Warming: Can World's Nations Agree on 2 Degrees? »

November 23, 2015

Stanford experts weigh in on Paris climate talks

Stanford Woods Institute

A new Stanford study debunks a widely accepted view of a hiatus in the recent rate of global warming.

Global Warming 'Hiatus' Never Happened »

September 17, 2015

A new study reveals the evidence for a recent pause in the rate of global warming lacks a sound statistical basis. The finding highlights the importance of using appropriate statistical techniques and should improve...

By Ker Than, Stanford News Service

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