Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Past News: 2018

Diverse forests are stronger against drought »

September 20, 2018

Diversity reigns when water gets scarce. New research suggests the most resilient forests are made up of trees that have a wider variety of rates for water moving up from the soil.

By Paul Gabrielsen, University of Utah, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Plastic waste on a beach in Hawaii

Last Straw: the Path to Reducing Ocean Plastic Waste »

September 18, 2018

Driven by public pressure, governments and corporations are considering eliminating or phasing out single-use plastics such as straws. Stanford experts discuss the limitations of these bans and the potential for meaningful change.

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

New Threats, New Opportunities »

September 17, 2018

During an event at the Global Climate Action Summit, experts from Stanford and the Woodrow Wilson International Center discussed new evidence to support a key EPA decision that established the need to protect people’s health and...

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

hurricane from space

Hurricane Florence: The science behind the storm »

September 14, 2018

Atmospheric scientist Morgan O’Neill discusses what’s driving Florence, why it’s unusual, and how it could be connected to climate change and other storms brewing in the Atlantic.

By Josie Gartwhaite, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Stanford experts spotlight climate and health at Global Climate Action Summit »

September 11, 2018

Stanford experts discuss the linkages between climate change and health, an area that will be a focus of Stanford-led events at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco.

By Devon Ryan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

destroyed house

Managed Retreat: Transparency May Improve U.S. Home Buyout Programs »

September 11, 2018

New research finds government buyouts of homes in floodplains have often lacked transparency. This could deter residents from participating in managed retreat, one of the main strategies for adapting to areas becoming more...

By Danielle Torrent Tucker, Stanford News Service

​Could water utilities transform the way the electric sector did? »

September 10, 2018

A newly ​developed model looks at how updated regulations and financing options could help renew our aging water infrastructure.

By Tom Abate and Shara Tonn, Stanford School of Engineering

leatherback sea turtle

Why Tracking Migrations is Crucial to Keeping Marine Animals Alive »

September 4, 2018

Understanding the movements of migratory marine animals through different countries' waters and in the open ocean beyond is vital to their management and conservation.

Stanford School of Humanities & Sciences

Russian wheat aphids (Diuraphis noxia).

Climate change projected to increase insect-driven crop loss »

August 30, 2018

By James Urton, University of Washington

Global Climate Action Summit-Affiliated Events »

August 29, 2018

Stanford researchers and students hosted a number of events in connection with the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco.

By Devon Ryan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Seed of Solutions  »

August 23, 2018

A perspective on basic research as a pathway to solving environmental challenges.

By Chris Field, Perry L. McCarty Director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

Alumni of the Youth Water Trustee program

Honoring Jordan River Peacemakers »

August 23, 2018

The Stanford Bright Award will be presented to EcoPeace Middle East at an Oct. 4 event on the Stanford campus.

By Taylor Kubota, Stanford News Service

leopard

Teaching Biology in the Bush »

August 13, 2018

Stanford graduate students learn to mentor undergraduates through hands-on training in remote African ecosystems.

By Taylor Kubota, Stanford News Service

Coachella Valley

Who Owns the Aquifer? »

August 3, 2018

Stanford researchers map out groundwater at stake in the wake of a court decision that bolsters Native American rights to the precious resource across an increasingly arid West.

By Josie Gartwhaite, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Does a Fishing Ban Have to Hurt Fishing Communities? »

August 2, 2018

Fishers who complied with a moratorium in the Adriatic Sea maintained catch levels by fishing in other areas. The findings help justify extending regional protection and provide insight for ocean management elsewhere.

By Nicole Kravec, Stanford News Service

border wall with javelinas

Over the Borderline »

July 24, 2018

Stanford biologists discuss border region's unique natural ecosystems and a continuous barrier’s potential ecological damage.

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

water

Natural Chromium Sources Threaten California Groundwater »

July 23, 2018

Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, offering a new perspective on California’s groundwater management challenges.

By Danielle Torrent Tucker, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

man holding head

Warming Temperatures Could Increase Suicide Rates  »

July 23, 2018

By comparing historical temperature and suicide data, researchers found a strong correlation between warm weather and increased suicides. They estimate climate change could lead to suicide rate increases across the U.S. and Mexico.

By Michelle Horton, Stanford Center on Food Security and the Environment

A New Way to Store Wind and Solar Electricity on a Large Scale »

July 19, 2018

A new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.

By Mark Golden, Precourt Institute for Energy

Jon Krosnick

Public support for climate policy remains strong »

July 16, 2018

A new study shows that Americans overwhelmingly want a reduction in global warming and support renewable energy development. But according to the data, Americans don’t realize how many people share their beliefs.

By Melissa De Witte, Stanford News Service

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