Biography

Sabbie Miller is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Stanford University focusing on researching methods for improved materials design procedures to concurrently assess environmental impact and material performance. Under the direction of Professor Sarah Billington and in collaboration from several others from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Chemical Engineering, Sabbie is developing theoretical approaches to material design around a biobased composite composed of a microbially-produced polymer and natural fibers. Application of the methods Sabbie is developing allows for strategic implementation of composite design measures and constituent selection techniques. For the specific application to the biobased composites, her methods have allowed for over 60% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions associated with composite manufacture, while maintaining the desired mechanical properties. Implementation of these techniques in the design of infrastructure materials at a larger scale could aid in lowering the environmental impacts associated with the built environment.

In addition to her research, Sabbie has served in a variety of outreach and mentoring roles across the university. These include teaching science engagement classes for underrepresented middle and high school students from traditionally underrepresented communities in the Bay Area. She was the outreach coordinator for the Stanford Polymer Collective, organizing and running community engagement projects for science related endeavors. In addition, Sabbie has been active with on campus women in science groups, acting as a collaborator and mentor for several projects. Also, Sabbie has acted as an undergraduate mentor for eight undergraduate students, guiding and emboldening them to pursue research related interests.

Sabbie received her Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from Washington University in Saint Louis with a concentration in structural engineering in 2008. She received her Master of Science degree in 2010 from Stanford University in civil and environmental engineering, with an emphasis on sustainable design and construction. She has received several academic awards including the Leveall Graduate Fellowship, the Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results Graduate Fellowship, and the Achievement Rewards for College Students Graduate Fellowship.